How to prevent ED relapse

Updated: Nov 28, 2021

Most important: Do not let your weight fall too much.


"Too much" means fall below your healthy weight at which you get your period (at minimum).


I view an eating disorder as something to be mindful of lifelong, if one has a tendency toward one! My genes and personality predispose me to eating disorders, so I have to make sure my weight doesn't drop enough to trigger anorexic behavior. It's akin to an alcoholic avoiding alcohol, knowing it'll cascade into unhelpful behaviors. I have more videos on eating disorders on my channel, explaining the biological basis


I can't "cure" myself of being an hyper-conscientious person any more than an alcoholic can cure themselves of getting addicted to drinks. But what I can do is put myself in the right environment free of what will cause me to spiral into restrictive food intake & overexercise.


And I will always have to be vigilant of staying in the right environment, but it's a small price to pay for what will happen if I go down the anorexia rabbit hole. I just accept this as what I need to do for life It's totally okay


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My biggest struggles during eating disorder recovery were (1) the physical part of eating so much food so often to recover weight and (2) the mental part of trying to not over-exercise.


To prevent relapse, what's #1 is that I don't let my weight fall.


Now, as a recovered person, I purposefully exercise way less than my brain tells me to. I’m naturally high-strung and I try to get the mental energy out through more ways than just exercise.


I know I have it in my genes to be anorexic when my weight falls too much, so I am mindful of keeping it up. And if I have food thoughts I pay attention to them and my hunger cues and try to never go hungry for too long - I always have snacks on me, as all my friends know.


Recovery can be long and painful and there can be relapses. I can’t sugercoat that, but I can promise that on the other side of recovery it’s amazing. It’s reclaiming your life and being able to spend more time on what you actually want to do, like enjoy doing things with family and friends. I go by the mantra “eat to live, not live to eat.” Life is more than just food. Food is great, but it’s just an enabler for so many other things that also give us joy and meaning. Recovery is worth it.